Art style

Luffy’s New Powers Finally Justify One Piece’s Controversial Art Style

The absurdity of Nika Model Devil Fruit Luffy’s newly awakened powers finally justifies One Piece’s controversial art style.

Warning: contains spoilers for One piece chapter 1045!

Whereas A play has been criticized for its cartoonish art style in the past, the final chapters of the manga prove that no other art style would suit the story so well. A play is a manga by Eiichiro Oda which follows the adventures of the pirate Monkey D. Luffy and his crew. Although it is unquestionably one of the most popular manga in the world, in the West it has often lagged behind other popular series like Bleach and narutofor various reasons.

A play can be daunting to step into as a new fan as the series is over 1000 chapters in length with some claiming it sees a major increase in quality after the first 100. But one of the main things that many readers cling to is its non-standard art style, which can be seen as childish compared to more realistically styled series. Many characters in A play have over-the-top and extravagant designs, and the series as a whole is drawn in a way that seems rather cartoonish. As with any piece of art, it’s a stylistic choice that works for some and not for others, but a new fighting technique Luffy unlocked in the later chapters of the series proves it couldn’t be. drawn differently.


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In Chapter 1044, Luffy finally awakens his true Devil Fruit powers. While for most of the series everyone thought Luffy’s fruit was the Gum Gum fruit, it turns out that his fruit is the mythical human fruit: the Nika Pattern. Nika was a sun god who was a representation of liberation, so using the awakened powers of the Nika fruit allows its user to fight freely in any way they please. This allows Luffy to fight in a very cartoonish way, bending physics and physiology to his liking like something straight out of looney tunes. His powers also affect everyone around him, resulting in moments where characters’ eyes literally pop out of their heads in surprise.



The One Piece character's eyes pop.

These exaggerated powers would look odd in a more realistically styled manga. The reason they fit naturally into the world of A play is that Oda has already drawn the series in a cartoonish style for its entire 25-year run. While it’s unclear if Oda chose to do this so that Luffy’s new powers wouldn’t feel out of place when he finally revealed them, it certainly makes their introduction less shocking than it would have been. other.

Even though Oda didn’t foresee Luffy’s ultimate powers before deciding A play‘s art style – and the mangaka is famous for planting mysteries and secrets long before they’re revealed – these new powers definitely highlight one of the series’ greatest strengths. While featuring incredibly dark plot points, A play has always been able to inject humor into its story, thanks in large part to the extremely expressive art. So during LuffyThe new powers of may be an explicit vindication of the manga’s art style, it’s ultimately just the latest in a long list of reasons why A playThe art of is perfect for the story it tries to tell.


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